Salesianum’s Social Studies curriculum plays an important role in the ongoing formation of a Salesian Gentleman – one who desires to broaden perspectives, seeks truth, exhibits gentleness toward his neighbor, compassion for the poor, and goes forth prepared to help others, and the world, become better. Students are taught to appreciate historical events, achievements in all humanities fields and the diversity and commonality of the world’s peoples. Circumstances including geography, economics, culture and values are studied, without judgment, to learn how they impact the behaviors of individuals, groups and societies.

An emphasis is placed on contextualizing trends
and patterns throughout history, recognizing the impact on, and relevance to, other historical time periods, including the present. And, as a part of understanding these events and trends, students will execute detailed research papers and projects and are also challenged to broaden their perspective by interpreting history utilizing the lens of Salesian Spirituality and values, including empathy, unidiversity, and social justice. A message of life-long growth is sent by encouraging students to go forth to be both politically and civically responsible as individuals and groups, striving towards a more just society.

Social Studies Faculty

List of 8 members.

  • Photo of William Sutherland

    Mr. William Sutherland 

    Social Studies Department Chair & Faculty
  • Photo of Theodore Godfrey

    Mr. Theodore Godfrey 

    Faculty
  • Mr. Colbe Klein '04 

    Faculty
  • Ms. Maria Lantz 

  • Mr. Robert McConaghy 

    Faculty
  • John Sweeney 

    Faculty
  • Mr. Sean Tischler 

    Faculty
  • Mr. Taylor Trevisan 

    Assistant Athletic Director & Faculty
    (302)654-2495 ext. 250

9th Grade Courses

List of 1 items.

  • Courses

    AP Human Geography
    World History-CP, AC, HN

10th Grade Courses

List of 1 items.

  • Courses

    AP U.S. History
    Power, Privilege & Difference
    U.S. History-CP, AC, HN

11th Grade Courses

List of 1 items.

  • Courses

    AP U.S. Government and Politics
    Modern World History-CP, AC, HN
    U.S. Government-CP, AC, HN
    Electives:
    Accounting-AC
    AP Psychology
    AP Microeconomics
    Death and Dying-AC
    Entrepreneurship-CP
    The Human Connection-AC (Padua exchange course)
    Global Issues-AC (Padua exchange course)
    Personal Finance-AC
    Power, Privilege & Difference-AC (Salesianum exchange course)
    World Affairs

12th Grade Courses

List of 1 items.

  • Courses

    AP U.S. Government
    Economics-CP, AC, HN
    U.S. Government-CP, AC, HN
    Electives:
    Accounting-AC
    AP Psychology
    AP Microeconomics
    Death and Dying-AC
    Entrepreneurship-CP
    The Human Connection-AC (Padua exchange course)
    Global Issues-AC (Padua exchange course)
    Personal Finance-AC
    Power, Privilege & Difference-AC (Salesianum exchange course)
    World Affairs

Phasing System

At Salesianum, phasing seeks to intellectually challenge students in a positive learning environment among peers. Each student is placed in a particular phase in Religious Studies, English, Social Studies, Mathematics, World Languages, and Science. Differences between phases of the same course can include breadth and/or depth of content instruction, pacing, academic rigor, and homework expectations. Additionally, the expectations regarding compositions, analysis, research, and rhetorical capabilities differ among the phases. The characteristics of courses in each phase are as follows:
  • College Prep Foundations (CP): CP courses with the “Foundations” designation are available in English, Mathematics, and Spanish for 9th and 10th-grade courses. Fundamentals are emphasized to develop foundations for success at the college level. Scheduling of these courses allows for the best student-teacher ratio available. These courses are characterized by reinforcement of study and organization skills, frequent assessments, scaffolding (moving students progressively toward greater understanding), and a variety of methodologies including guided discussion. Students build their composition, research, and rhetoric skills.
  • College Prep (CP): CP courses emphasize fundamentals in preparation for the college level. Students are actively led toward greater academic independence. These courses are characterized by frequent assessments, scaffolding (moving students progressively toward greater understanding), and a variety of methodologies. Students build their composition, research, and rhetoric skills.
  • Accelerated (AC): Accelerated courses are characterized by increased pace, depth, and connections among unit concepts. Students are cognitively engaged for independent work, and the instructor challenges students to rapidly reach higher-order thinking. Students consistently demonstrate their established composition, research, and rhetoric skills. When calculating GPAs, 0.2 points are added to AC courses.
  • Honors (HN): Honors courses challenge students with exceptional content depth and complexity. Course tasks proceed rapidly from content introduction to higher-order thinking which challenges students to connect concepts and to apply knowledge to new situations. Formative assessment (monitoring student learning) is included, but summative assessment (evaluating student learning) drives the grading for these courses. Students should build upon established composition, research, and rhetoric skills and anticipate exceptionally rigorous expectations. When calculating GPAs, 0.3 points are added to HN courses.
  • Advanced Placement (A.P.): These college-level courses are governed by the curriculum of the Advanced Placement Program (A. P. Program) of the College Board and all syllabi are College Board approved. For an A. P. course, after successful completion of the cumulative examination offered by the College Board, college credit or advanced standing may be granted. When calculating GPAs, 0.4 points are added to A.P. courses.